We appreciate everyone’s patience during these trying times. To reserve items, please call the Library at 516-333-0176

 

The Westbury Library Board of Trustees will be holding their next monthly board meeting on Thursday, April 15th at 7 pm

 

Please feel free to join using this link https://us06web.zoom.us/j/94867672055
Or this phone number 1 646 558 8656 alongside this ID 948 6767 2055
 

Westbury School District Weekly Meetings

The Westbury School District is holding weekly meetings updating the community on COVID-19. Please find more information by clicking the button below and join them every Thursday at 5:30 PM with any questions you may have.

Libby

The Libby app is a new, streamlined way to borrow digital books and audiobooks from your library. Now with more items from the RBdigital catalog

Available Now: Empire Pass

The Empire Pass is your key to all season enjoyment to New York State Parks. Reserve now by checking out our Museum Passes page!

Never miss a Westbury event again!

Burbio.com is a free website and app that streams all Westbury schools, library, and community events in one place.

Special occasion coming up?

See which of our specialty cake pans are available at the Children’s Library!

Free Online Learning Through Coursera and New York State

The New York State Department of Labor is partnering with Coursera, an online training provider, to grant New Yorkers free access to nearly 4,000 online programsto help hone their skills in data science, business, and technology. Coursera’s programs are developed in partnership with top universities around the globe and were specifically chosen for inclusion in this offer to help job seekers gain skills needed to advance in their careers.

Hoopla at The Westbury Library

Beginning December 29, 2020, library cardholders can register for Hoopla a digital service allowing patrons to download and stream videos, music, ebooks, and more to their computers, smartphones, and tablets. For more information, Please click the button below.

Smart Alec Printing is now available.

Patrons can now print from home or any device by using SmartAlec our new web-based print management service. Simply send your documents through SmartAlec and print them when you come into the library using your library card. Click the button below or download the SmartAlec App on your Android or iPhone to continue

Nassau County Vaccination Info

The COVID-19 vaccination is available at several locations in Nassau County. Information about getting vaccinated including current elligibility information is available by clicking the button below

Library Reopening Announcement

THE LIBRARY IS RE-OPENING FOR CONTACT-LESS PICKUP ON JUNE 29TH
We are happy to announce that beginning on Monday, June 29, 2020, the Westbury Memorial Public Library will offer contact-less pickup on weekdays, Monday through Friday, from 9:30 am – 8:30 pm. To reserve items, please call the Library at 516-333-0176 and tell us what you are looking for, or visit the Library website at www.westburylibrary.org. If you are unsure of what you would like to read or view, our librarians will be happy to help you make a selection. Once your items are ready to be picked up, we will call you and check them out to you.
Patrons should call the Library upon their arrival to pick-up material so that a staff member can bring the requested library materials to the table that will be set up outside each library. The items will be placed on the tables for contact-less pick-up. A monitor will be present to ensure that this process goes smoothly.
Please note that we will only be able to provide items that are part of the Westbury Memorial Public Library catalog as long inter-library loan services remain suspended. We will be determining when the libraries can be re-opened to patrons and when other services can be provided based upon our ability to comply with government directives. We certainly hope that the Library can be fully operational as soon as possible. Thank you for your understanding and your continued support.

The Board of Trustees
Judy Gerrard, President
Denise Parillo, Vice President
Marie Rousseau, Trustee
Shirley Darkeh, Trustee
Carmen Lloyd, Trustee

Highlight: Databases

Tutor.com provides help with math, science, social studies or English on a kindergarten through college level.

Check out Tutor.com, or browse our many free databases!

Librarian’s Pick: The Daughters Of Kobani – Gayle Tzemach Lemmon

Medium “The story of how young Kurdish women brought down terrorists from the Islamic State group has been waiting to be told. If Kobani, Syria, is a city that has gone unnoticed in the saga of Middle Eastern wars, then The Daughters of Kobani: A Story of Rebellion, Courage, and Justice will change that. It’s the story of a new generation of combatants, long denied choices about education, marriage or their very futures, who vanquished hosts of kidnappers, rapists and enslavers. Yet when author and journalist Gayle Tzemach Lemmon was asked to tell their story, she hesitated. “It just doesn’t make sense that the Middle East would be home to AK-47-wielding women driven with fervor and without apology or hesitation to make women’s equality a reality—and that the Americans would be the ones backing them.” She decided to go see for herself.

By 2016, civil war was tearing Syria apart, leaving room for ISIS, with help from allies such as Russia and Iran, to swagger in. President Barack Obama pledged that there would be no American troops on the ground; American support would have to come from the air, with airstrikes and weapons drops, while consultants and diplomats strategized from afar. On the front lines in Kobani were women like Azeema, trained as an expert sniper, and her childhood friend Rojda, whose mother still called her every day.

Based on hours of on-the-ground reporting and countless interviews with Kurdish Women’s Protection Units (YPJ) fighters, Lemmon delivers a vivid, street-by-bombed-out-street account of the final days of the battle for Kobani. Strewn throughout are reports of what the soldiers were up against: appalling ISIS acts like beheadings, torture and worse. The YPJ was outnumbered and underequipped, but they were fearless.

The battles for Kobani, and later Raqqa, were key moments in a history that is still being made. With international interest waning and ISIS sleeper cells and foreign fighter recruitments quietly continuing, ready to reignite the landscape, those Kurdish and Arab victories in 2017 and onward hold no guarantees. As Lemmon observes, it is “easier to kill a terrorist than to slay an ideology.” Still, no matter the final outcome, the women who fought this war have shown the world what courage and justice look like. And if the next generation must keep fighting, these warriors have shown them how.”

Click here for availability

Librarian’s Pick: The Doctors Blackwell – Janice P. Nimura

Medium “Florence Nightingale and Dorothea Dix loom large as women who reformed health care in the 19th century—in the fields of nursing and mental health, respectively—but Elizabeth and Emily Blackwell have remained largely unrecognized for their roles in medical history. No longer, though, for Janice P. Nimura’s compelling biography The Doctors Blackwell: How Two Pioneering Sisters Brought Medicine to Women and Women to Medicine reclaims the sisters’ enduring contributions to medicine and to women’s history.

In breathtaking prose and exhaustive detail, Nimura chronicles the lives of the Blackwell sisters—their childhood in England, their immigration to America, the challenges they faced as they made their way in the medical profession and their eventual establishment of institutions that would provide both access to quality medical care for women and a place where women could study medicine in order to practice it.

Attracted to healing as a teenager, Elizabeth saw medicine as a noble vocation, but as she sought to embrace her calling she encountered resistance at almost every turn. Eventually she was able to graduate from Geneva Medical College in New York, becoming the first woman in the U.S. to earn a medical degree, after which she set up a practice in New York City. Emily followed in her older sister’s footsteps, attending Rush Medical College in Chicago and the Medical College of Cleveland, where she became the third woman in the U.S. to receive a medical degree. In 1857, the two sisters founded the New York Infirmary for Indigent Women and Children, and in 1868 they opened the Women’s Medical College in New York City, where Elizabeth taught courses on sanitation and hygiene and Emily taught obstetrics and gynecology. By 1900, the college had trained more than 364 women, and the sisters’ work led to thousands of women becoming educated in the medical field.

Nimura’s compelling biography not only recovers the lives and work of Elizabeth and Emily Blackwell but also provides a colorful social history of medicine in America and Europe during the mid- to late-19th century.”

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Librarian’s Pick: The Three Mothers – Anna Malaika Tubbs

Medium ” In The Three Mothers: How the Mothers of Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, and James Baldwin Shaped a Nation, Anna Malaika Tubbs tells three stories that are often overlooked but deeply important to civil rights history. Tubbs explores the lives of “the women before the men,” as she calls them: Alberta King, Louise Little and Berdis Baldwin. Though each woman came from a different part of the U.S. and the Caribbean, faced diverse social and economic challenges and had divergent interests and ambitions, Tubbs knew that, because the women were so close in age (by some accounts their birthdays are only six years apart), she would find common ground among these women’s lives that superseded their connections to famous men.

Tubbs intentionally chose the mothers of leaders whose lives have been well documented so she could focus on the women’s lives instead. In this way, The Three Mothers offers space for Tubbs, a debut author, to weave biography and social commentary with the complex history of Black women living in the 20th century. Tubbs also makes room for moments of discovery that help us better understand how each of these civil rights icons’ social activism and artistic endeavors were shaped by their mothers’ shining examples. For instance, Alberta King’s radical maternal tenderness set the groundwork for how her son would view himself as a “mother” birthing a dream of racial equality. We also learn how Louise Little’s childhood love of dictionaries would lead her incarcerated son, Malcolm, on a quest for knowledge that would reroute his early delinquency, and how Berdis Baldwin would pass on her gift of both the written and spoken word to her oldest son, James.

As Tubbs explained in an interview for BookPage, there is a troubling binary between motherhood and intellectual labor, and her writing about three women whose sons’ lives were shaped by their mothers (and not vice versa) is an attempt to turn that binary on its head. The Three Mothers does just that, expanding conversations about King, Malcolm X and Baldwin beyond what these men gave the world to include what the world gave them through the lives of three intelligent, ambitious, trailblazing women.”

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