The Library is open for CURBSIDE PICKUP ONLY.

We will continue to monitor local, state, federal, CDC, and WHO guidelines and will keep you abreast of all pertinent information. We appreciate everyone’s patience during these trying times. To reserve items, please call the Library at 516-333-0176

The Westbury Library Board of Trustees will be holding their next monthly board meeting Thursday, November 19th at 7 pm via Zoom

Please feel free to join using this link https://zoom.us/j/97661902610 Or this phone number 1 646 558 8656 alongside this ID 976 6190 2610
For assistance learning how to use zoom please feel free to watch the video posted at this link https://youtu.be/yiqnQtYc__4
 

Libby

The Libby app is a new, streamlined way to borrow digital books and audiobooks from your library.

RBdigital

Digital magazines at your fingertips. Zinio for libraries is now RBdigital.

Available Now: Empire Pass

The Empire Pass is your key to all season enjoyment to New York State Parks. Reserve now by checking out our Museum Passes page!

Never miss a Westbury event again!

Burbio.com is a free website and app that streams all Westbury schools, library, and community events in one place.

Special occasion coming up?

See which of our specialty cake pans are available at the Children’s Library!

Friends of the Library

The Friends of the Westbury Library is Launching!
Please contact Kathleen Gaskin at (516) 333-0176,
Ext. 1151 or send an email to:
kathleengaskin@westburylibrary.org

Free Online Learning Through Coursera and New York State

The New York State Department of Labor is partnering with Coursera, an online training provider, to grant New Yorkers free access to nearly 4,000 online programsto help hone their skills in data science, business, and technology. Coursera’s programs are developed in partnership with top universities around the globe and were specifically chosen for inclusion in this offer to help job seekers gain skills needed to advance in their careers.

5 Owls- Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Spoilers

Welcome to our spoiler-iffic Sorcerer’s Stone post!

This post is for readers who have finished the series and are using this opportunity to revisit Hogwarts. If you have not read ahead, please wait to read the rest of this post. Questions, polls, comments, etc. may expose you to important plot points, and if you’ve only read the first book, it’s too soon!!

In the comments we want to know:
  • What did you notice in this book that comes back later? For example, Hagrid uses Sirius Black’s motorcycle on the day Harry was brought to the Dursley’s. 
  • Where does Prof. Quirrell rank among Defense Against the Dark Arts teachers?
  • Could the characters have done anything differently in this book that would have affected the outcome of the series?
  • Have your feelings about any of the characters we meet in Book 1 changed based on how they develop throughout the series? 
    Specifically:
How do you feel about Severus Snape?
  • Add your answer

Let us know in the comments if you have any ideas for a poll

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We ask library patrons under 13 to participate in these discussions with adult supervision. We would like to encourage families to incorporate discussion questions into their at-home book chats. This post is for discussing overarching theories and ideas, and for connecting what happens in this book to events in future installments. Spoil away.

Please be respectful.

Highlight: Databases

Tutor.com provides help with math, science, social studies or English on a kindergarten through college level.

Check out Tutor.com, or browse our many free databases!

Librarian’s Pick: Memorial – Bryan Washington

Memorial by Bryan Washington“It sometimes feels like romantic relationships are becoming harder and harder to navigate. Meeting someone, getting to know them, constantly finding ways to communicate about everything, searching for common ground, trying and failing to move forward or take a leap of faith—it’s all exhausting. The routine isn’t entirely disheartening, though, and to the most curious of minds, it can be fertile ground for analysis and creation. So it is with Bryan Washington’s debut novel, Memorial, a celebratory lamentation of modern love.

The novel follows two men who are in love with each other. Through a major miscommunication, Benson, a Black day care worker in Houston, ends up living with his boyfriend Mike’s Japanese mother, who doesn’t seem all too happy to be the guest of someone she has never met before. Mike, on the other hand, is a chef who must travel to Japan to help his father, who is dying of cancer, through his final days.

As the novel begins just before Mike’s departure, the two men are unsure of their path forward together. This classic will-they-won’t-they scenario gives Memorial a timeless feel, but by placing two gay men at the center of this familiar setup, Washington poses fresh questions about contemporary romantic relationships with quiet grace. From the intermittent use of text messages and shared photographs to the mastery of a decade of slang, his writing is invigorating, reminding the reader of the realities every human must face and how we’ve all learned to communicate them.

Memorial is more than just a love story—though it is a very good love story. It’s this generation’s response to centuries of love stories, to a whole history of them. It’s what is coming; it’s what is here.”

Click here for availability 

Click here for e-Book

Librarian’s Pick: Black Sun – Rebecca Roanhorse

“In the holy city of Tova, the winter solstice is usually a time for celebration and renewal, but this year it coincides with a solar eclipse, a rare celestial event proscribed by the Sun Priest as an unbalancing of the world.

Meanwhile, a ship launches from a distant city bound for Tova and set to arrive on the solstice. The captain of the ship, Xiala, is a disgraced Teek whose song can calm the waters around her as easily as it can warp a man’s mind. Her ship carries one passenger. Described as harmless, the passenger, Serapio, is a young man, blind, scarred, and cloaked in destiny. As Xiala well knows, when a man is described as harmless, he usually ends up being a villain.

Crafted with unforgettable characters, Rebecca Roanhorse has created an epic adventure exploring the decadence of power amidst the weight of history and the struggle of individuals swimming against the confines of society and their broken pasts in the most original series debut of the decade.”

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Librarian’s Pick: The Invention of Murder – Judith Flanders

“In this fascinating exploration of murder in the nineteenth century, Judith Flanders examines some of the most gripping cases that captivated the Victorians and gave rise to the first detective fiction.

Murder in Britain in the nineteenth century was rare. But murder as sensation and entertainment became ubiquitous, transformed into novels, into broadsides and ballads, into theatre and melodrama and opera―even into puppet shows and performing dog-acts. Detective fiction and England’s new police force developed in parallel, each imitating the other―the pioneers of Scotland Yard gave rise to Dickens’s Inspector Bucket, the first fictional police detective, who in turn influenced Sherlock Holmes and, ultimately, even P.D. James and Patricia Cornwell.

In this fascinating book, Judith Flanders retells the gruesome stories of many different types of murder―both famous and obscure―from the crimes (and myths) of Sweeney Todd and Jack the Ripper to the tragedies of the murdered Marr family in London’s East End; Burke and Hare and their bodysnatching business in Edinburgh; and Greenacre, who transported his dismembered fiancée around town by omnibus. With an irresistible cast of swindlers, forgers, and poisoners, the mad, the bad and the dangerous to know, The Invention of Murder is both a gripping tale of crime and punishment, and history at its most readable.”

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